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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
violence of course. we have great guests on the show, including public citizen energy director and edward isaac dovere. but i guess the real important story is that mc hammer came out and sang [ inaudible ] at the american music festival. >> is that what happened? >> john: yes. >> i can't wait to tell my grandchildren that this one-hit wonder cy went on with mc hammer. >> john: yes, cy came -- >> deep it going dan. ♪ >> john: cy came out and lip sinked. he is playing the studio version, and then mc hammer comes out and [ inaudible ] his third biggest hit -- >> this sounds like a train wreck. >> john: if you listen very very closely to this you can hear the founding fathers weep. and we'll be talking about david petraeus. because there is now a backlash of people saying why should he have to resign? the obvious answer is because he is the biggest spy in america and spies get fired for less. but what do you think? if america needs him running the cia, if he can do for america what he did for afghanistan, why would you want him leaving? >> yeah. >> john: please feel free
things. you need great intellectual energy and physical energy. petraeus is the first guy since world war ii the public has known. the irony, it to me -- one of the surprises to me in writing this book is the people we lionize, the soldiers of world war ii, they were the people became the generals of vietnam. the we rightly demonized. they're the same men. the difference is, world war ii, there was accountability. in world war ii, success was rewarded, the failure was punished. nobody knows -- first american commander in the african european in the army in world war ii. he was fired. a bunch of other generals were fired. they were replaced by names -- in 1940, dwight eisenhower was lieutenant-colonel on the west coast. george marshall picked him out and said that is the type of guy i need and began promoting these guys. we do not have leadership these days. instead, we have a parade of generals go into iraq. mediocrity, not doing much. coming home feeling entitled to a promotion. that is what has happened to the military over the last 50 years. tavis: what is at the epicenter of this -- 1
gas under my town. it's a game changer. ♪ it means cleaner, cheaper american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ part of a whole new line of tablets from dell. it's changing the conversation. ♪ i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ >>> coming up, the president publicly defended his u.n. ambassador susan rice this week against pointed criticism from republicans. >> if senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody,
guess. >> john: let me say one thing in john mccain's defense. he has more energy than most 40 -year-olds i know. he proves that age is nothing but a number every day. i would never make fun of his age. i would make fun of his desperation and his desperate case to stay relevant with the tea party that despise him in his own republican wing. >> caller: nation has no appetite to go back to war anywhere. let's resolve the issues we've got. and you know, work peacefully. >> john: i agree jack. you're right. thank you very much. i'm glad -- it is 3:30 where you are. i wish you a great day. it won't be light for another six hours. thank you jack from oregon. we'll be taking your calls and i'll be joined by dan glickman now from the bipartisan policy center. i'm john fuglesang. this is the "bill press show." good morning. fast max. use as directed. (vo) cenk uygur is many things. >>oh really? >>"if you ever raise taxes on >>the rich, you're going to destroy our economy." not true! [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] on your radio and
revolution has reenergize north american energy markets and is fundamentally reshaping energy policy. if you think about drones and the war on terror and what technology has allowed, a footprints' the -- a footprint that is more effective in getting bad guys without much involvement on the ground, is the changing technological environment working to overturn established power orders or to reinforce the established power orders? david. >> as you say, this is an ebb and flow and always has been, just as the american stance of when we want to intervene and when we want to pull back has gone in a cycle. the technological flow has gone in a much faster cycle. in the past 10 years, i think it has reinforced american power. if you look at what president bush was doing in his second term and what president obama has doubled down on and triple down on in his first term, what you see is an exploitation of these technologies to try to replace traditional, on the ground kinds of wars of attrition that we have traditionally been in. drones are a great example, as you mentioned. there were 48 or 49 drawn
, afghanistan/pakistan and u.s. energy policy as the six top issues. so starting with that, looking at it strategically, do you feel that those are the core issues before president obama and this administration and our country going into 2013? um, if not, what would you change, what would you add? >> i -- when i was informed by lori murray about the outcome of the process by which the world affairs councils went through and came up with those six issues, i thought you had it exactly right. i think those are the big issues, and congratulations to you. i think you have them just right. i think there is an overarching issue on top of all of them that in some sense effects and enables all of them x that is if you look at at the national security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic
american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ without freshly-made pasta. you could also cut corners by making it without 100% real cheddar cheese. but then...it wouldn't be stouffer's mac & cheese. just one of over 70 satisfying recipes for one from stouffer's. a great clean doesn't have to take longer. i'm done. [ female announcer ] unlike sprays and dust rags, swiffer 360 dusters extender can clean hard to reach places in less time. swiffer. great clean in less time. or your money back. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and my daughter loves the santa. oh, ah sir. that is a customer. let's not tell mom. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. >>> mike murphy, the fallout from mitt >>> mike murphy, the fallout from mitt romney's discussion that basically obama gave gifts to minority
the conversation. one is for a clean, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. >>> so where do republicans go from here, a week after the party stinging defeat. jack cafferty is following that in the cafferty file. >> wolf, to say the gop needs to do some soul searching in the aftermath of the 2012 election might be putting it mildly. while mitt romney failed to connect with the majority of american voters, the republicans' problem is a whole lot bigger than mitt romney. as one long time republican leader told politico, the gop needs to realize it is too old, too white, too male, maybe even want to add too rich to that. this republican says the party has to figure out how to catch up with demographics of a changing u.s. before it is t
atomic energy agency. cnn's senior international correspondent matthew chance has more. >> wolf, it's another highly critical report of iran's nuclear program from the u.n.'s nuclear watchdog. it's filled of course with stuff about how iran continues to fail to cooperate with u.n. inspectors and refuses to answer questions about the alleged military dimensions of its nuclear activities. iran of course says its nuclear program is for purely peaceful purposes. but of most concern say western diplomats is the fact that iran has stepped up its capacity to enrich uranium adding more sen ri fujs to its highly secured underground bunker at a place built into a mountain to defend it against potential air strikes. the report says iran has effectively doubled its enrichment capacity there theoretically making it able to have material for a bomb much more quickly than it could do previously. to report, not exactly a game changer perhaps. but still a very worrying document for those countries who like the united states iran's nuclear program very suspiciously indeed. wolf. >> matthew, thank you
capital is a big drag, but on the other hand, there's energy prices low. you've got a low relatively -- natural gas, you got housing, having apparently hit bottom, starting to turn, so there's a variety of things. there's a lot of money on the sidelines. >> you raised china. talk about china for a second. the united states, europe, japan, latin america, asia excluding china, every one of those regions experienced a financial and economic crisis in the last 20 years. china stands out as not having gone through such turmoil. can they continue? can they keep that up? is china the next country that we have to worry about for some kind of economic upheaval? >> i'll start. well, the short term, i think what's important for people to understand this year with the political transition is the chinese leadership has a real fear of inflation, and this goes back to 89. they were going o error on the side of being careful with food prices, higher inflation. now that they are threw that, what you start to see if they've got the resources to be able to avoid a hard landing, but the critical questio
that it takes as much time and energy for a young person to come back and then get into a different routine as it did to pare and train them to go to war. i think we need to do a lot of hard thinking, both in the department of defense, and the v.a., about what our policies and procedures are. >> but before the 11th anniversary of the war in afghanistan, we broadcast from colorado springs. we have looked at a unit that came to iraq and came back and could not turn off the kill switch, they were killing their girlfriends and their wives. the murder rate was about 14 times the rate in colorado springs. that is an important point on these issues. we see, in the peace in "the new york times," the story of staff sergeant white smith. he comes home and randomly runs down a 65-year-old woman and throws her into the back of the car and kills her. we see these her the crimes here, but what about what they are doing there? look at the case of robert bayless, the question of the court-martial at fort lewis- mcchord. >> absolutely. war is messy. certainly, these wars in iraq and afghanistan have been ve
would add is the america's energy futures. that is a whole different presentation. i have to get back to work. i am sure you do, too. we set out to revitalize the alliance's. we decided to engage more deeply to advance our interests. as a result, these determinations, the president ended the war in iraq. he has started a path for transition in afghanistan. and doing so, the president has dramatically improved america poses strategic freedom of maneuver so that our posture alliances -- by renewing our leadership and ensure our focus matches our priorities and resources, and a laser light focus. for the geographic part of this, the president made a decision on the outlook to increase our focus on the asian pacific in terms of resources, diplomatic efforts, engagement, both with nations and regional institutions, and in terms of policy. secateurs clinton became the first secretary of state to make her inaugural trip to asia. the first foreign leader the president met with in the oval office was the prime minister of japan. these were early and important signals of the priorities that the
it is they were going to do anyway. >> i think we can have one last question. >> jim gingrich, energy research. to respond on gems comment on american policy. the review of the effective drug strategy, and does this represent an increasing militarization of american foreign policy? >> that's a very good question. question is to turn approach in yemen and elsewhere a reflection of u.s. foreign policy -- is greater militarization. >> yeah, that is a very, very big question. with regards to yemen, i definitely think you are onto something and i think there's a couple of reasons out what to very briefly and in closing. one is that drones, you know, there's a sense that using drone strikes, using airstrikes as a way that the affect the really combat its enemies without putting american forces at risk and with a sort of suffering the casualties we've seen in iraq and afghanistan. and while i think that maybe true long-term come i have great concerns about the potential blowback from his actions and that the potential casualties will be later on. that's a very difficult argument to make. i don't thin
-term recovery was at the stimulus really did begin this long-term reinvestment. it was by far the largest energy bill in the history of the country. we been spending a few billion dollars a year. the stimulus port and 90 billion, just a complete game changer for wind, solar and other renewables, energy efficiency and every imaginable form. [applause] i got for saying he thinks. for this marker, electric vehicles, biofuels, clean energy research and the technologies of tomorrow and factories to build the stuff in the united states. not just energy, but the stimulus is going to drag our antiquated health care system into the digital era so that your doctor might not kill you at this chicken scratch handwriting by 2015 just about every american will have an electronic medical record, which really should improve care and reduce costs and is really a down payment on health care reform. this included the most ambitious education reform in decades with race to the top of the largest infrastructure investment since eisenhower. it had the largest research investment other, the largest middle-class tax cu
tax reform. we could have energy legislation. we haven't even had a defense bill or appropriations bill or cybersecurity. joe lieberman is still trying to get the cybersecurity bill which is really important for this country. really dangerous. but the president, he is our leader. he needs to engage more. we got somebody here in the room that can talk to him. i'm incurable optimist. i think he may do it. >> well, i think it's got to start in this lame-duck session that begins tomorrow. we can't adopt a total bipartisan balanceed budget agreement but we can get -- balanced budget agreement but we can get started. we can have a down payment at least to cover the first year of what otherwise would be the sequester which is $110 billion, and i think we got to prove we can do some tax reform and we can do some entitlement reform and pull it together. and then adopt a process that tries again to push the committees -- according to the regular order -- to come out with enough savings and spending, enough new revenue as part of tax reform and most critically long-term entitlement reform. t
that obama came into that meeting with a tremendous amount of confidence and energy, that he had put the question before the american people, 60% of the american people said yes, as part of this fiscal cliff deal, taxes have to gun on to ue wealthy, and i think he'll get a good deal. >> i think they'll get a punting deal. but romney, he made an unfortunate comment, but the biggest problem he had was the republican primary. that is what is driving the brand to a disaster right now. and we have to get kind of a party view of america that is not right out of rush limbaugh's dream journal. we need to look at reality. >> what's the future of the tea party? you heard bill kristol saying we should give up some of this protection of tax cuts for wealthy americans. are you prepared to give up on that particular point to get a larger deal, including cutting government back significantly? >> i'm not if what it means is that we're going to raise taxes and we're not going to decrease any spending. if you remember that moment in the primary where they asked all 10 candidates -- >> the 10 to one, r
to the energy and commerce committee, you are actually lying to all of those people who are now going to bear the pain of the harm which is being done in the gold state region -- the gulf state region. >> thinking back to the time, did you know at the time -- did you have suspicions at the time that lies were being told? >> yes. we had experts who were telling us that they felt that the flow rate was much higher. we had experts who arrived who said that, if they could gain access to this billc -- to the spill cam, they would be able to determine how large the flow rate was. and determine the flow rate being more -- flow rate by being given more access to all of the different angles that the camera made it possible to observe the spill. once that happened, the experts around the country who lack access to that information dramatically -- who had access to that information dramatically increased the damage they thought was being done. it was a exponentially-higher spill rate then they had represented to us on may 4, that they had represented initially in the first week after the spill, and whic
and energy across-the- board themjeff, you had a press . >> , but will this be in the future? >> that is contributed and raised. i love was proud to have been on the national finance committee for the president. but weaver able to contribute with our partners and enemies li-- we endorse 233 candidates. we did well with the vast majority of them. we have losses here and there. particularly with moderate republican said did not win. i came in june and work my darnest to direct as many resources as the could and to raise outside of the building. more people notice brad pitt's contribution and more people opened his e-mails and mine. i will continue to be as aggressive as i can be. this is a turning point. this is our moment. we have to keep fighting like victoriesn thiese because the stakes are too high and the consequences of losses are significant. >> say the supreme court takes one of these cases and it is decided in our favor and 41 states have marriage equality. what do you say to the opposition's opposition the this will become the next abortion? >> if the supreme court st
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)